Welcome to Compose. There's lots of stuff here, all about composing paintings.

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Friday, July 4, 2008

Rules?

Artists tend to be mavericks, tend to reject rules of any kind. It's the creative side of our nature to question assumptions, to extend beyond the accepted, to test many waters, to argue. Without our rebel side, no worthwhile art would exists at all. No good music, no decent paintings, no important poetry. None of the good stuff that holds our attention. Music that we can listen to repeatedly, paintings that we keep going back to, poems that we tend to read again and again--they simply could not exist without disregard for status quo.

Then what about these rules of composition that many artists reject, but seasoned artists hold dear? They are not rules at all, but principles. There's a vast difference: a rule is fixed, a principle is flexible. A rule is man-made, a principle is the cause of an effect. A rule assumes a bias, a principle is a fundamental truth.

Our principles for visual composing are the results of observations made by artists over ions. They are our guidelines within which there are limitless possibilities for variation, expansion, alterations and elaborations. These principles are not static, but organic. They are like the gravity that holds us to the earth.

The posts to follow will be my thoughts about visual composing. I hope you enjoy the ride.

5 comments:

Susan Carlin said...

Love the concept for your new blog. I'll be a devoted reader.

Dianne Mize said...

Just can't stop teaching, can I? I'm excited about the potential here. Glad you'll be checking in.

Bonnie Mann said...

Lessons well repeated! I will be visiting here often. Thank you.

Dianne Mize said...

Thanks for dropping by, Bonnie.

James Kissel said...

Well said. I've been trying to generate a discussion on composition over on wetcanvas, but each time I either get rebuked with; "too much knowledge, just paint", or even worse, "keep painting, you will understand composition later (when you grow up)" or the thread dies from lack of participation.

I'm so pleased to have found your blog about composition and to find a fellow painter who can and is willing to discuss composition.

all the best
jlk